Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC Entry GPU Review

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Gigabyte GTX1650 OC 4GB
Gigabyte GTX1650 OC 4GB

Today we have a Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC graphics card to take a look at and run through our tests. At around $150, it is an entry model for those looking at GPU compute. With the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC one gets a small size, low power consumption, and heat output that will work well in small form factor systems. The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 does not have RT and Tensor cores on the TU116 chip which helps reduce the price of this class of cards. It also sacrifices the newest NVENC logic using an older version. For users who have limited budgets yet still need a GPU for an offload or even for a mixed traditional workstation plus GPU compute offload model, the GTX 1650 can be a great option.

At STH, we have been putting together a series testing the compute performance of desktop GPUs in order to help our readers understand non-gaming use cases for the cards. This is important because today’s GPUs are used for more than just gaming and have significant value as computational tools. NVIDIA’s strategy involves providing CUDA capable hardware throughout price brackets, and the software ecosystem has responded with GPU acceleration for content creators, deep learning/ AI professionals, and in other fields. Continue on our review to read more about how the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 4GB GDDR5 GPU stacks compared to the GPUs we have reviewed thus far.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC Overview

Here we see the retail box for the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC. This denotes that this is an OC edition card that uses Gigabytes Windforce technology to cool the graphics card.

Gigabyte gtx 1650 OC 4GB Box Front
Gigabyte gtx 1650 OC 4GB Box Front

The back of the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC retail box shows a graphic of how the Windforce cooling system works and a minimum of additional content describing the graphics card.

Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Box Back
Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Box Back

Here we see the front of the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC. The GTX 1650 OC is a small graphics card, measuring 191mm in length, 112mm tall and 36mm thick. Two 80mm fans spin in alternate directions to cool the GTX 1650 OC. These fans are shaped to smooth airflow and help reduce fan noise.

Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Front
Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Front

The back of the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC shows a small PCB for this graphics card with the aluminum heat sink extends past the edges along with the outside plastic covering. This is clearly a case where the card looks larger and more impressive when viewed from the fan side.

Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Back
Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Back

The top of the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1650 OC measures 36mm thick and is mostly taken up by the aluminum heat sink. No extra power connector is used on the Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC as enough power is supplied through the PCIe slot. With the small size of the GeForce GTX 1650 OC, it does not require a backplate.

Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Top
Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Top

Video outputs include one DisplayPort 1.4 and two HDMI 2.0b ports. That is enough for many lower-cost workstations and even edge digital signage.

Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Outputs
Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Outputs

Here we have a close-up of the size of the aluminum heat sink which stands off from the PCB a fair amount to provide extra airflow for cooling.

Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Heat Sink
Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC 4GB Heat Sink

Next, let us take a look at the Gigabyte GTX 1650 OC key specifications and continue on with our performance testing.

10 COMMENTS

  1. Performance might seem on par with other nvidia models but if you compare this by price to lets say a RX570 or RX580, its very bad value for money.

  2. You included too much worthless information and not enough practical information. We’re is the 1060 and 1070? Who gives a shit about how it stacks up against a Titan rtx x2? Get real.

  3. I think this is one of NVidia’s most useless cards ever.

    First the memory leaks, now the patent issue with Xperi Corp. It are hard times for mister “the more you buy, the more you save”. Linus Torvals will laugh his head off.

  4. I think people are being a little unfair here – or perhaps unrealistic – bearing in mind the target audience of the site is home severs, which may not have a PSU that supports extra power.

    Yes, the price is high for the performance on an absolute scale. But that does not recognize that you simply *cannot get* a 75W PCIe-only powered card that matches it from AMD. No RX 580 or RX 570 here – no, you will be stuck with the RX 560 (or RX 460) and the same 4GB RAM, getting anywhere from two thirds to a half the performance, or maybe even less: https://www.anandtech.com/show/14270/the-nvidia-geforce-gtx-1650-review-feat-zotac

    The WX8200, that meets the 1650 in some benchmarks, and does twice as well in others, uses *three* times the power – a TDP of 230W.

    Absolutely, wait for Navi to see if it can do better. I hope it does, because I want to use a card with good open-source drivers. But if you can’t – if you need 75W, no more, now – this may be the best there is; and it’s priced accordingly.

  5. This was clearly written by someone who doesn’t know anything about computer hardware or gpus.

  6. We’ve been using these in many of our servers exactly for what you describe. We’re using them with Xeon D Supermicro boards powered off of the motherboard in 1U systems. It looks like someone here has linked and brought the gaming kids here. NVIDIA’s still where it’s at if you want inferencing at the edge. Anyone that thinks AMD’s in the game today against CUDA isn’t in the space. Maybe that’ll change, but NVIDIA’s easy and it works, AMD there’s always troubleshooting.

    @Paul I can tell you it’s useful to us. We buy a spectrum of GPU’s for our customers. Having this info top to bottom is handy both for us and for our customers.

    Good review. I’d like to see a blower style 1650 review since that’s the sweet spot in the market

  7. Most of the comments here seem to have been made by those who own a giant rig and a powerful PSU — gamers. For those of us who prefer a system with a small physical footprint and low power consumption, while still being able to play at 1080p competently, this card is basically it for now until the fabled RX 3060 comes out. The comparison between this and the RX570 simply isn’t fair due to the huge discrepancy in power consumption. I do love AMD and support them when I can to create competition to Intel and NVIDIA, but it’s been a known fact that they compensate with lack of finesse with just raw and massive heat/power/energy consumption, which could costs end users hundreds if not thousands of dollars per year, and is horrible for the environment.

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