Dell Precision T7920 Dual Intel Xeon Workstation Review

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Dell Precision T7920 Workstation GPU Rendering Related Benchmarks

Next, we wanted to get a sense of the rendering performance of the Dell Precision T7920 with the NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 using CUDA. Our previous results with Blender and Cinebench focused on the performance of the dual Intel Xeon Platinum 8260 CPUs. These days more rendering applications support GPU offload, so this is an important aspect to look a as well. We again can leverage our existing data set for GPU performance results.

Arion v2.5

Arion Benchmark is a standalone render benchmark based on the commercially available Arion render software from RandomControl. The benchmark is GPU-accelerated using NVIDIA CUDA.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 Arion
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 Arion

MAXON Cinema4D 3D

ProRender is an OpenCL based GPU renderer which is available in MAXON’s Cinema4D 3D animation software.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 Cinema4D
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 Cinema4D

OctaneRender 4

OctaneRender from Otoy is an unbiased GPU renderer using the CUDA API. The latest release, OctaneRender 4, introduces support for out of core geometry.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 OctaneRender
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 OctaneRender

Redshift v2.6.32

Redshift is a GPU-accelerated renderer with production-quality.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 Redshift
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 8000 Redshift

Overall, paired with the Quadro RTX 8000, the Dell Precision T7920 workstation performs extremely well. The Precision T7920 is also not limited to a single GPU which is a big part of the platform’s value proposition. The ability to scale-up to higher-end configurations in the same platform is a key differentiator.

Next, we are going to look at the Dell Precision T7920 workstation with several Deep Learning benchmarks.

Next, we are going to look at the power consumption before getting to our final thoughts.

12 COMMENTS

  1. I’ve got one of these in the office – great machine, and I love the layout of the motherboard (lenovo is also using a layout like that now too), but theres some things to look out for depending on what you’re using it for and how you’re using it:
    1- if you have nosy coworkers who like looking at the hardware in the chassis, just show them the machine before its turned on, since opening the chassis during operation will shut the machine down while triggering a chassis intrusion alarm. At least on my early model, it also bugged out the dell support assist feature so it permanently thinks a fan is broken, when that fan was never installed on that model.
    2- in order to keep the overall width of the unit within reason for product dimensions and cooling reasons, the clearance for cards is roughly equivalent to a 3U server. In places, that is actually slightly less, because the side panel latch has an internal bump running the height of the server. Tall cards like some consumer GPUs will not fit in this case, nor will short-length consumer GPUs that have outward/side facing (as opposed to front facing) pcie power plugs, as the bump will be in the way of the cable. Long standard height consumer GPUs with side facing pcie power plugs will fit, but you might have to squeeze the cabling a bit
    3- There were 3 included pcie 8/6pin cables. If you are using consumer GPUs, you may need to buy additional cables from dell or use splitters. At the time I bought my unit, dell did not have the cables for purchase individually, but I managed to cludge an equivalent cable together out of adapters, since the PSU breakout board’s connectors for the pcie power plugs have the same pinout as (cont in next)

  2. 3 (cont)- the plug would on the pcie card as well.
    4- If you want NVME support, you’ll need an adapter. You can bifurcate the lanes, but not explicitly – there is a setting in the bios (i forget which, but it has to do with pcie ssds), that you can toggle. Out of the box it was set to a setting where it would not detect dell’s own quad nvme adapter card, and dell’s enterprise support doesn’t have enough experience with those cards (or even the product specifications on hand) to do more than manually walk through trial and error experimentation of figuring out how to use the card in this machine. Turns out its that bios setting.
    5- If you need audio for the work you intend to do on this machine and are expecting to get by with the motherboard audio since its usually ‘good enough’ on highend prosumer motherboards, you will be disappointed. Get a soundcard for this – I didn’t need amazing audio or anything, just audio good enough to listen to people speaking during meetings and checking the contents of files I was processing or working with, but the built in audio was really bad.

    It should be kept in mind that my forewarnings are based on a very early unit (I got it within a month of launch, since I needed something more powerful right then in order to complete a project)
    Despite these issues I encountered, I still very much like this machine, and they wont be problems for everyone.

  3. Thanks for the info Syr. I am curious about your point #3 — I have avoided Dell workstations because they only offer 8/6 pin PCIe power connectors, while most consumer GPUs (e.g. 2080 Ti) require 8/8 connectors. It would be great to learn more about how you figured this out.

  4. Hi Michael – to clarify what I had meant by 8/6 was that the cables included with the system supported the full 6+2 connector, but only 1 per cable. The system came with 3 such cables pre-installed, but had 4 available headers, thus I was able to determine the pinout by simply matching the cables on the card side to the PSU breakout board side. It helped that Dell used standard cable color codes (yellow for +12 and black for 0).
    I’m using 2x 1080ti cards in the system with 2x 8-pin plugs on them for a total of 4 plugs required, so I had to cobble together a cable out of adapters to power the second plug on the second card from the 4th empty plug on the PSU breakout board.

  5. Syr–thanks for the reply! So it sounds like there are a maximum of 4 x 8 PCIe plugs available. That’s enough for 2 consumer GPUs. A 3rd GPU may not be possible.

  6. I hope this will help someone who is considering the purchase of a Dell workstation make a better decision. I loved my old T7600 – it worked perfectly for close to 6 years. There was no question in my mind when I replaced it – I was going with a Dell Precision Workstation. Since purchasing the T7920 in the summer of 2018, Dell has replaced it twice and replaced several major components in those replacements.
    Today, a Dell level 3 tech told me they have known of systemic issues with the T7920.

  7. I have Dell 7920 Workstation , purchased in March 2018. Although , There was a problem in the begining , now working OK. Can some one advise , how to add Thunderbolt card ? It does not have TB header . Although a area is marked TBT , but no socket on it.

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