New NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada for Professional Workstations Here Are the Specs

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NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Edition Cover
NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Edition Cover

At NVIDIA GTC 2022 Fall, NVIDIA launched a GPU that was not part of its keynote. The NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada is a name that is going to confuse many, but it is a high-end professional workstation graphics solution based on the new Ada Lovelace architecture.

NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Launched

This is going to be perhaps one of the most confusingly named parts. Years ago, before Quadro branding was phased out we had a NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 GPU Review.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000

It was hard to get a RTX A6000, but you may have seen one in our recent NVIDIA RTX A4500 20GB GPU Review, pictured on the right as an example:

NVIDIA RTX A4500 And RTX A6000 5
NVIDIA RTX A4500 And RTX A6000 5

This is the new GPU:

NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Edition Cover
NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Edition Cover

Now we have the Ada generation. For a naming recap, that means we are going:

  • NVIDIA RTX 6000
  • NVIDIA RTX A6000
  • NVIDIA RTX 6000 (Ada)

To make things a bit more confusing, we covered the NVIDIA L40 also based on Ada Lovelace, and that line went from “A40” for Ampere to “L40” for Lovelace. The actively cooled cards use a different naming convention. That makes things confusing enough, but then we went to NVIDIA’s website, and the spec table for the new card looks like this:

NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Specs
NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Specs

The minimal information in the spec sheet is similar to what we saw with the NVIDIA L40 launch. The bigger issue is that NVIDIA is calling this the “NVIDIA RTX 6000” the same name as the Turing generation. Indeed, when we looked at the spec table we pulled in our RTX 6000 review (Turing) we saw this:

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 Specifications
NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 Specifications

With the Quadro brand being phased out, this is going to cause confusion.

Luckily, even though NVIDIA’s website is more focused on selling software and solutions than professional GPUs with information like specs, we managed to get the specs of the card:

NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Key Specs
NVIDIA RTX 6000 Ada Key Specs

What is going to be interesting for folks here is that this is the new generation of GPUs but only at 300W. So there is a big power gap now between the professional 300W TDP GPUs with ECC support and 48GB of memory and the 24GB non-ECC RTX 4090.

NVIDIA Ada Lovelace Performance And Power
NVIDIA Ada Lovelace Performance And Power

It remains to be seen how these GPUs fare, but usually, we get great gains in each generation that expand over time. Many professional applications are using AI tools, and that is a focus of Ada Lovelace, so we expect the new generation to get better with time as tools take advantage of newer GPU architectures.

Final Words

This is a strange one. Not being able to find specs easily for a GPU on NVIDIA’s website is strange. They should be there and easy to access. What is more, NVIDIA picked just about the most confusing name it could by calling this the RTX 6000. We hope that NVIDIA re-names this the RTX L6000 to be consistent with the data center version (L40) and make it easier for everyone to understand. Going RTX 6000 to RTX A6000 to RTX 6000 is too confusing of naming conventions. I do not even do STH’s GPU reviews, but I saw the problem immediately searching through images in the site’s CMS for “RTX 6000” and seeing three generations of GPU images pop up. We at least expect the card to be better than this naming.

Luckily, we made this handy guide so you can understand NVIDIA’s data center and creative professional naming conventions:

NVIDIA Professional GPU Naming Logic Turing Ampere Ada Lovelace Gens
NVIDIA Professional GPU Naming Logic Turing Ampere Ada Lovelace Gens

5 COMMENTS

  1. The spec looks little bit off as it listed a “PCIe CEMS 16pin” power connector but the pictures clearly shows a traditional 8-pin connector.

  2. I feel like the naming confusion isn’t a mistake. NVIDIA has a glut of Ampere GPUs that they still need to sell. If some uninformed consumers are happy with getting an Ampere GPU instead of an Ada GPU then all the better for NVIDIA.

  3. It is surprising and disappointing that the datasheet does not have FLOP/sec and rays/sec performance specs. NVIDIA is probably trying to hide the poor performance/price ratio of this card. Considering the cost and effort to design a GPU like this, you sure would expect NVIDIA to put a little more thought into the name. As companies get bigger, they tend to hire more marketing dummies and that may be what is going on here.

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