Seagate Nytro XP7102 NVMe Add-in Card Released

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Seagate Nytro XP7102 front
Seagate Nytro XP7102 front

Ahead of Flash Memory Summit 2016, Seagate is launching a new NVMe add-in card. The Seagate Nytro XP7102 is designed to provide existing server designs storage with up to 2.5GB/s transfer speeds using a traditional PCIe 3.0 x4 slot. By utilizing a half-height, half-length design the company is able to target even compact 1U and 2U server designs and slots that are empty in those servers.

Seagate Nytro XP7102 front
Seagate Nytro XP7102 front

The pictures we received of the new card are utilizing a Marvell controller with Micron NAND and DRAM and we have seen versions with both full height and low profile brackets.

Seagate Nytro XP7102 rear
Seagate Nytro XP7102 rear

Key specs are read speeds of 2,500 MB/s with write speeds of 900MB/s. 70/30 mixed workload IOPS are rated at 110K.

Seagate Nytro XP7102 overview
Seagate Nytro XP7102 overview

Seagate told us that these cards will be available at launch. We hope to get one to test in the near future as the majority of the servers we are building now have PCIe/ NVMe SSDs. There is still a large market of servers that are using slower SSDs or hard drives that can benefit from a SSD cache device. The endurance on these drives is rated at 3 DWPD in both the 800GB and 1.6TB capacities.

Here are the key specs from Seagate’s website on the new cards (click to expand):

Seagate Nytro XP7102 specs
Seagate Nytro XP7102 specs

With the 5-year warranty and a 2 million hour MTBF it is likely that a majority of these drives will outlast servers that they are installed in. We also would note that the power consumption is well below some of the higher performance NVMe SSDs we have seen with maximum power consumption of 11.5w.

Overall, more options in the PCIe and NVMe space are welcome. 2016 will see an expansion in terms of NVMe devices on the market as well as with capacities. We will start to see releases such as the Seagate Nytro XP7102 become more common where lower capacity points (e.g. the 400-512GB capacity range) will be omitted.

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Patrick has been running STH since 2009 and covers a wide variety of SME, SMB, and SOHO IT topics. Patrick is a consultant in the technology industry and has worked with numerous large hardware and storage vendors in the Silicon Valley. The goal of STH is simply to help users find some information about server, storage and networking, building blocks. If you have any helpful information please feel free to post on the forums.

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