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Intel DC S3710 and S3610 SSDs announced
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Intel DC S3710 and S3610 SSDs announced

by Patrick KennedyJanuary 29, 2015

Intel has announced the new Intel DC S3710 and S3610 series of solid state drives (SSDs). The Intel DC S3710 is designed for heavy write workloads, using 20nm High Endurance Technology (HET) MLC NAND. Endurance is up from the Intel DC S3700 generation with the lowest capacity 200GB S3710 model allowing 3.6PB written over five years and the largest capacity 1.2TB drive rated at 24.3PB written. While the S3710 is rated at 10 full disk writes per day, the S3610 is a lower cost three full disk write per day option with 1.1PBW to 10.7PBW of rated endurance on the 200GB and 1.6TB models respectively.

Here is a quick capacity/ write endurance table for both families:

Intel DC S3710 S3610 Launch Capacities and Endurance

Intel DC S3710 S3610 Launch Capacities and Endurance

Both drives aim to deliver relatively high performance for SATA 3 drives and Intel focuses on performance consistency even under heavy write workloads. The higher performance should address the gaps we saw between the Intel DC S3700 and Samsung 845DC Pro we saw recently.

Intel DC S3710 Performance Specs

  • Read and Write IOPS (Full LBA Range, IOMeter Queue Depth 32)
    • Random 4KB Reads: Up to 85,000 IOPS
    • Random 4KB Writes: Up to 45,000 IOPS
    • Random 8KB Reads: Up to 52,000 IOPS
    • Random 8KB Writes: Up to 21,000 IOPS
  • Bandwidth Performance
    • Sustained Sequential Read: Up to 550 MB/s
    • Sustained Sequential Write: Up to 520 MB/s

Intel DC S3610 Performance Specs

  • Read and Write IOPS (Full LBA Range, IOMeter Queue Depth 32)
    • Random 4KB Reads: Up to 84,000 IOPS
    • Random 4KB Writes: Up to 28,000 IOPS
    • Random 8KB3 Reads: Up to 52,000 IOPS
    • Random 8KB Writes: Up to 14,000 IOPS
  • Bandwidth Performance
    • Sustained Sequential Read: Up to 550 MB/s
    • Sustained Sequential Write: Up to 520 MB/s

Expect standard features we have come to expect from Intel’s DC series of drives including power loss protection. Hopefully we can get drives soon to test but major OEMs are already designing these drives into products so we should see them soon. Intel is also building a lineup of SATA drives that mirror the three tier structure introduced by the NVMe based Intel DC P3700, P3600 and P3500 families.

About The Author
Patrick Kennedy
Patrick has been running ServeTheHome since 2009 and covers a wide variety of home and small business IT topics. For his day job, Patrick is a management consultant focused in the technology industry and has worked with numerous large hardware and storage vendors in the Silicon Valley. The goal of STH is simply to help users find some information about basic server building blocks. If you have any helpful information please feel free to post on the forums.
2 Comments
  • smccloud
    January 29, 2015 at 6:53 am

    I wish these were out when I specified a storage server for work, I would have used them for L2ARC & ZIL drives.

  • nzcloud
    February 6, 2015 at 8:34 pm

    The S3610 would be amazing if it’s price reflected it’s DWPD being 1/3rd of a S3710. Unfortunately it does not, and is 2/3rd the price of a S3710.

    For the added insurance, I would skip it and go for the S3710.

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